PHOTOBANK
When first looking at this artist I was impressed by the amount of emotion that was able to be expressed through simply composed images. The way that the Lauren has captured the male form  and is able to still preserve the vulnerability of these men inspires what I wish to create. 
The way which these photos have been curated from 50 photoshoots the resulting series has a emphasis on capturing this sensitive theme. This quality in her own words is ¨imagery exploring a female sensual response to male beauty¨, qualities that I extract from this as what some women desire from men(suggesting lack there of).
(https://www.laurastevens.co.uk/him-text)
This article below provides further context to the images with it consisting mostly of an interview with Laura Stephens. I hope to somewhat emanate the personal connection,she describes of, with the male models that I cast by sharing an emotional connection with 'them' during the 'capturing' process.


The above ceramic forms contain the aesthetic in which I would like to be able to attain in my own work. The simplicity, visual interaction between the additions and the work itself, and the surface textures are the key reasons for including them as source images. 
With these three images they are included here to highlight the traditional and contemporary presence of the severed masculine form. The first image is Matteo Mauro Studio's "Sweet Half" a marble sculpture being an oud to classicism and is presented eloquently in a digital format. This medium in which it becomes globally acessible is worth exploring in the future for the final medium to present my work. I like the clean figure and the way that with the form in its modified disassociated state, the masculine chest becomes somewhat abstracted in design. 
The second image is a sculpture from Jago a highly commemorated marble sculptor from Italy who is currently a professor at NYC School of Art. All of his work is stunning and is highly intricate. I am amazed by his stone sculpture and I appreciate the way that he works in clay, marble and plaster  in his practice, in opposition to the clear gravitation to two by many other current sculptural artists. I could see myself approaching him for a mentorship in the future but I imagine I'd need a significant introduction or grand accolades myself before feeling comfortable approaching him
Thirdly I included this torso being a classically inspired bust but being carved in 1980 by an unknown sculptor but having sold for $20,000 at auction. The form and the monochromatic quality of the photo being what allured me to the photo.
After my critique in week 7 after the suggestions of my peers in that the rope will likely be seen as erotic in my work I was suggested to play with the scale within rope. This eluded to the premise of how there exists a gendered distinction between thread, yarn, cord and rope. I was also attracted to the other context of rope within art. When knots are applied to these materials they bring forth different meanings, yarn being knitted and how rope is tied into nets. Both are utilitarian but placed on different tiers. Knitting is considered a hobby and sissy for a man to partake in. 
After since creating my first iterations of my sculpture I believe there is merit in extending the narrative of knitting rope. In particular I would like to experiment with the merging of a tomboy stich(French knitting) tool with my forms and the suspension using this created yarn. 
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